Emergency Uses For Trash Bags

Emergency Uses For Trash Bags

Here at UK Survival Guides, we love items that have alternate uses and in this post, we are going to be looking at the emergency uses for trash bags.

The great thing about these is that they are lightweight and inexpensive but you generally get quite a lot for your money. Plus they don’t exactly take up much space so can easily be added into your storage area.

In most cases, the emergency uses that we are going to look at will be fine with just the normal household garbage bags. Some of those listed, however, will require more heavy-duty garbage bags.

  • Emergency poncho – just cut or tear a hole for the head and arms.
  • Emergency shelter – keeping a trash bag and some duct tape can make for a quick emergency shelter.
  • Dry feet – open a trash bag, step inside and tie or secure with duct tape and keep rain and snow at bay.
  • Waterproof storage bags – trash bags are waterproof so you can use them to protect other items such as clothing from the rain.
  • Ground cover – trash bags also make a great ground cover to help keep dry.
  • Food prep – when out in the field, trash bags can be used for food prep such as mixing together.
  • Solar water still – they are effective as part of a solar water still.
  • Water container – trash bags will hold a decent amount of weight but will need to be carried carefully so the plastic does not tear and the water spill out onto the ground. This is where heavy-duty trash bags would be better.
  • Keep sleeping bag dry – place the sleeping bag into the trash bag before getting in. Kind of like a sleeping bag within a sleeping bag!
  • Sunshade – fix it to branches to create a temporary sunshade.
  • Pressure bandage – they can be used for bandaging wounds.
  • Splinter support – tie a splint with a trash bag, double the bag or tape two together to make a sturdier splint.
  • Collect rainwater – tie the trash bag to something sturdy in an open area to collect rainwater for a clean water supply.
  • Trail markers – tear a trash bag into strips and use to mark your trail so that you can find your way back.
  • Emergency backpack – you can make a temporary backpack with a trash bag to help carry supplies.
  • Keep backpack dry – if it’s raining, attach a trash bag over your backpack to keep the contents dry.
  • Bear bag – if you are heading into an area where there might be bears, use your trash bag to create a bear bag. Put food and anything with a sweet smell in your bear bag. You can then hang it from a tree, at a distance from your campsite.
  • Floatation device – trash bags are airtight. It can be filled with air to help you wade across a body of water with your gear. It can also aid you in a scenario where you have to tread water.
  • Leave no trace – you can obviously use it as intended and clear up your rubbish before leaving the area.
  • Forage collection – If you come upon a large number of blackberries or other wild foods, use the trash bag for collection.
  • Emergency toilet – when there is no place to do your business, a trash bag may be your option. A bucket and a garbage bag and you have an emergency toilet.
  • Insulating clothing – like the poncho method but put it under your clothing to trap heat.
  • Sling – if someone injures their arm or shoulder you can use a trash bag to hold it stationary.
  • Body bag – we all hope we would never have to deal with this kind of thing but in an extremely bad situation, a trash bag can be used as a body bag.
  • Collect water from trees – Find a low hanging limb with lots of leaves. Put the limb with all of the leaves in the garbage bag. The sun will draw out the moisture from the leaves and it will collect in the bottom.
  • Melt snow – if you need water and there is snow on the ground this can be a lifesaver.

There are countless other applications for a trash bag. Just like in most survival situations, we are only limited by our needs and imagination. Get in touch on social media and share your own ideas with us.

Survivalist

Craig Burr is the founder and editor of UK Survival Guides.He has a passion for emergency preparedness and survival that he wants to share with others through the use of articles and gear reviews.Stay safe!

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