Most Common Myths about Homeschooling

Most Common Myths about Homeschooling

There are many misconceptions floating around about homeschooling, some are just funny, some are annoying, and some are flat out dangerous. During this guide we want to clear up some of the most common myths about homeschooling.

Homeschooled Kids Don’t Socialize

This is one of the most common myths around homeschooling that you will hear, and is also one of the most incorrect. A child in school sits in a class with the same thirty students every day. a homeschooled child gets to socialize with family, parents, neighbors, friends, and members of the community. The fact is, that homeschooled kids socialize MORE than those that are in public schools. Homeschoolers routinely visit museums, parks, science centers, and other places as part of their day. This creates more opportunities to socialize with adults and other people.

Socialization isn’t only about spending time in a classroom. It’s about interacting with other people, and it can happen anywhere.

Homeschooled Kids Can’t go to College

Since a lot of people think that homeschoolers don’t get a “real” education, they assume that colleges and universities won’t accept them. But it just isn’t true.

Homeschoolers have a higher rate of attending college than any other group of children: 66.7% of homeschooled children, compared to 57.5% of traditional public school children. Some of the top colleges actually seek out homeschooled kids and accept them at a high rate. These schools recognize the unique qualities and skills that such children often possess, such as being self-motivated and self-disciplined.

Homeschooling Doesn’t Prepare Them for the Real World

Most skeptics of homeschooling think that homeschooled kids won’t be prepared for the challenges of real life. They’ll constantly be under their parents’ care meaning they won’t experience the harsher realities of life. And when they grow up, they’ll be blown away by all the bad things of this world.

In fact, homeschoolers can turn out to be even more ready for real life than their peers, who go to schools. They have more time to interact with their parents and help them around the house. Parents can take them shopping, banking, and doing other ordinary things, depending on their age. It’s also a great idea to encourage a homeschooler to volunteer for some charity. Besides, parents can teach their kids to solve conflicts and make them more confident than a schoolkid can ever become.

Parents Are Not Qualified to Teach

Parents are actually the most important teachers in a child’s life, and they always have been. Parents are the ones who taught their child how to walk, talk, and eat, and are the first example that children look to when learning how to function in society. In many ways, parents are the most qualified people to teach their own children because trust and support have already been established. Not only that, but also parents today have more resources than ever.

Although not “traditional homeschooling,” comprehensive online programs that parents choose to educate their children include a professionally crafted curriculum. These school-at-home parents don’t go it alone; they have all the tools and resources amassed over many decades by a dedicated community of other homeschool parents. These often include access to certified educators and tutors to supplement the homeschool curriculum.

Homeschooled Kids Don’t Learn As Well

A homeschool program is extremely specific when it comes to how an individual child learns. Every child is different, and how each understands and absorbs new information is unique. Homeschooling provides a customizable way of teaching and learning for the child, which can help them learn at a faster rate than other public school children. It also means that your homeschooled child’s experience isn’t about what is best for all; it’s about what is best for your specific child.

There Are No Extra Curricular Activities Available

Homeschooling actually frees up more time for a child to be involved and active in the community. There’s no waiting for the whole class to settle down. Fewer distractions and no classroom disciplinary issues mean that students can focus better and move ahead when they’re ready. Instead of having typical school hours holding them back, homeschooled children will have extra time to play, relax, work on homework, learn new skills and hobbies, and participate in extracurricular activities later in the day with their friends.

Only Religious People Homeschool

If parents don’t want their kids to study at school, it means that they want them to only communicate with certain people. And it means that they must worry that others may influence their child’s worldview, including their religious views. At least, it’s what some people think when they think of homeschooling.

Like most other assumptions, this one is wrong as well. Homeschooling has nothing (or little) to do with religion. Many parents choose homeschooling because they want to choose specific learning methods for their kids, not because they want them to think in a certain way.

Of course, there are faith-based homeschools, but it doesn’t mean that all home schools are faith-based.

In Order to Homeschool Your Child, You Must be a Stay-at-Home Parent

For many years, a strong myth we have heard is that homeschool teachers are stay-at-home moms who don’t work. Like any family, there are some homeschoolers who do have stay-at-home parents (moms or dads), but many have both parents working, or have single parent households. How do they do it? Through a combination of hard work, cooperation, and support from other homeschooling families, parents who rely on two incomes can find ways to homeschool. It is important to remember, homeschooling is personalized and flexible, so by its nature – you can mold it to fit your family’s needs as best as possible.

Homeschooling Isn’t Legal

A lot of parents refuse the idea of homeschooling their kid because they think that authorities won’t let them do it, and they’re going to have problems. However, it’s not always true.

Yes, in some countries homeschooling a child can be illegal. But, since this type of education is becoming more common, it’s becoming legal in more areas. Therefore, a parent shouldn’t just assume that they can’t teach their child at home. It’s necessary to learn everything about the current education laws in the area they live in and see if homeschooling is legal there or not. We have to say that, most likely, it is!

Homeschooling Makes Kids Lazy

Since homeschoolers don’t have to go to school every morning, most people assume that they just sleep or play all day long. They don’t learn how to be disciplined and because of that, they will grow into becoming lazy adults.

Perhaps no assumption is as wrong as this one. In fact, homeschoolers spend less time sitting at home than most school kids do. They’re constantly involved into something from sports activities to book clubs. After they’re done studying for the day, they are free to do anything they want, and they usually want to do a lot of things!

So being able to study at home and spend all day in their pajamas isn’t the main goal for homeschoolers. It’s more like a bonus.

Homeschoolers Are Weird

There’s a common assumption that homeschooling is chosen by the parents who are eccentric and weird. Therefore, it’s also assumed that their kids are also eccentric and weird.

Nothing could be farther from the truth. Homeschoolers are just like all other kids. Some of them are shy introverts, while others are outgoing extroverts. Of course, some of them can be different, but why should it make them eccentric?

Besides, if parents want their kids to be educated in a non-traditional way, it doesn’t make them weird either. We should stop thinking that the words “different” and “strange” are synonymous because there’s no way they are.

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Sources: moms, connections academy, calverteducation

 

   

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